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Case Study:Congregation Beth Israel, Austin

The First PACE Project in Texas

The first PACE beneficiary in Texas is Congregation Beth Israel in Austin. PACE financing enables the synagogue to address critical HVAC failures without diverting charitable dollars from its core mission.


THE PROBLEM:
After years of spending $15 to $20k annually for chiller and boiler repairs with obsolete chiller and boiler parts becoming difficult to locate, Congregation Beth Israel (CBI) was finally forced to replace them. When the chiller failed last summer, children in the child development center were moved several times to nap and play in the chapel and sanctuary. On many mornings, The Way Companies’ trucks were the first to arrive at CBI to get the chillers back online before the children arrived to school. Even when the chillers were working, they couldn’t keep up with the Texas heat in the rooms facing the sun.

THE PACE SOLUTION:
Long term PACE financing with no out-of-pocket expenses enabled the synagogue to solve several critical issues. An energy audit was used to analyze all aspects of the building and identify potential energy savings. The final PACE project enabled CBI to finance new chillers and boilers, controls, and window film from a cash flow positive position. Through the PACE program, CBI is able to solve major energy, mechanical reliability, and comfort issues in a financially responsible way.

COMMUNITY IMPACT:
A well-known Jewish quote from the Babylonian Talmud asserts that, “You’re not required to complete the work, but neither are you free to abstain from it.” While no single individual, organization or community can complete the task of Tikkun Olam, mending and transforming the world, we all must take responsibility and play our part. Reducing our congregation’s carbon footprint and living with lightened impact on God’s earth through the vision and ingenuity of the PACE program not only makes economic sense, but also represents a sacred act of both responsibility and hope in the future.

- Rabbi Steven Folberg

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